News Literacy Project Staffers Featured in Journalism Publications

NLP staffers are prominently featured in two journalism publications this month.

NLP staffers are prominently featured in two journalism publications this month.

The cover story in the May/June issue of the Columbia Journalism Review (CJR) quotes Alan C. Miller, NLP’s president, and the spring issue of Inside Story, the magazine of the City University of New York’s graduate school of journalism, includes a feature about Elis Estrada, NLP’s New York program assistant.

The CJR article, “Streams of consciousness,” is a comprehensive examination of how young people get their news in the digital age and what this will mean for the future of journalism; it includes Miller talking about how snippets of text or videos, taken out of context, can be misleading. A sidebar, “That’s Incredible,” leads with a quote from Miller:

"A lot of students believe all news is created equal,” says Alan Miller of the News Literacy Project, which helps kids learn to assess the information they encounter. “At a younger age, they sometimes believe that if someone put it online, it must be true.” Older high-school students grow more wary of “bias, whether personal, commercial, or ideological.”

CJR is one of the leading journalism reviews in the country.

The CUNY magazine feature, “On the Job,” focuses on Estrada, a graduate of class of 2011, who divides her time between NY1, a local 24-hour cable news channel, and the News Literacy Project.  The report traces Estrada’s interest in journalism to the year that she spent as a member of AmeriCorps assisting low-income families in Brooklyn and her dismay at the lack of media coverage about their neighborhoods.

At NY1, Estrada is an associate producer on the consumer investigative unit, NY1 for You, and also works with the station’s education reporter. She produced much of the station’s coverage of Hurricane Sandy.

At NLP, she shares her experiences as a journalist and works with teachers and other journalists at De La Salle Academy, a middle school in Manhattan, and the Edward R. Murrow High School in Brooklyn.