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This month marks one year since the launch of our signature News Lit Tips.
John Silva, who has used the News Literacy Project’s curriculum as a history teacher in Chicago, will now be aiding other educators as NLP’s checkology™ virtual classroom coordinator.
News literacy’s moment has arrived.
When Dee Burek started teaching debate at Stone Bridge Middle School in Allentown, N.J., six years ago, she soon noticed a trend: Her students’ arguments were riddled with inaccuracies.
When NLP rolled out its dynamic checkology™ virtual classroom last May, our goal was to be in all 50 states with 100,000 registered students by the end of 2017.
The idea for the News Literacy Project came to me in 2006, when I spoke to my daughter’s sixth-grade classmates about what I did as a journalist and why it mattered.
Facebook is supporting a public service advertising (PSA) campaign by the News Literacy Project (NLP) that will provide Facebook users with the tools to become informed consumers of news and information and to know which sources to trust, the company announced today.
Steve Schmidt, who held top positions in two Republican presidential campaigns and serves as a political analyst on MSNBC, has joined the News Literacy Project’s board.
Students who complete the News Literacy Project’s core unit report significant changes in the ways they think about, share and respond to news and information they read or watch online, new survey data indicate.
Veteran journalist Leslie Hoffecker is joining the News Literacy Project as its senior editor.
As we reflect on 2016, we looked back at some of our social media posts that you liked most.
A survey released by the Pew Research Center today shows that fabricated news stories are causing members of the public to be confused about basic facts.
NLP played a prominent role at the National Council for the Social Studies Annual Conference on Dec. 2-4 in Washington, D.C.
Appearing this week as the featured speaker at a News Literacy Project breakfast in Washington, Chris Wallace, the anchor of "Fox News Sunday," called NLP "a terrific program."
A new study by Stanford History Education Group shows that students' digital fluency does not include understanding the news and information they read online. Miller shows how NLP can help.
This year, we’re kicking off the charitable season by joining #GivingTuesday, a global day of giving on the first Tuesday after Thanksgiving.
Gwen Ifill, one of the most respected journalists of her generation and a member of the News Literacy Project (NLP) board, died today in Washington, D.C. She was 61.
We have just weathered a presidential election in which a bitterly divided nation seemed incapable of agreeing on facts — let alone solutions — for the country’s myriad challenges.
Eva Haller, a much-honored nonprofit leader and philanthropist, is the newest member of the News Literacy Project board. She has been informally advising NLP President Alan Miller for the last three years.
NLP President Alan Miller presented the News Literacy Project’s John S. Carroll Journalist Fellow Award to David Gonzalez of The New York Times at a luncheon at the paper on Oct. 21.
Today Knight Foundation is announcing $225,000 in support for the expansion of News Literacy Project’s checkology™ virtual classroom in the Knight communities of Charlotte, North Carolina; Detroit; Lexington, Kentucky; Miami; and Philadelphia.
In the middle of the highly contentious 2016 presidential campaign, sometimes the only thing left to do is laugh — and there’s no reason to do it alone.
When the News Literacy Project launched its classroom program with an event at Williamsburg Collegiate Charter School on Feb. 2, 2009, Matea Gold, then a New York-based reporter for the Los Angeles Times and one of NLP’s first volunteer journalist fellows, was right up front in the packed auditorium.
David M. Marchick, a managing director of The Carlyle Group, and Karen Wickre, a digital media pioneer who held senior communications positions at Twitter and Google for nearly 15 years, have joined the News Literacy Project board.
Multimedia journalist Damaso Reyes has been hired as NLP’s New York program coordinator.
Alison R. Bernstein, a respected educator, scholar and foundation executive and a senior member of the News Literacy Project’s board, died June 30. She was 69.
One year ago today, the newspaper world lost a true luminary — and the News Literacy Project lost one of its guiding lights.
"Discerning Fact From Fiction in Our Digital-Age Democracy," a seminar on news literacy, drew an engaged and overflow crowd on Saturday during Wesleyan University’s 2016 reunion and commencement weekend.
Peter Adams, NLP's senior vice president for educational programs, moderated a special conversation with national political reporters Matea Gold and Abby Phillip from The Washington Post.
It is only fitting that Nicco Mele leads one of the core lessons in the News Literacy Project’s new checkology™ e-learning platform. After all, this digital visionary has been instrumental in helping us reach this milestone.
A New York City high school educator called it “a dream come true for teachers.” A Chicago school administrator described it as a promising way to learn about social media and digital citizenship.
A select group of students in the News Literacy Project’s New York classroom program demonstrated their news literacy know-how and journalistic skills Monday when they joined the national press corps at Columbia University’s Pulitzer Hall for the announcement of the centennial year Pulitzer Prizes.
The News Literacy Project is joining the celebration of the Pulitzer Prize centennial to provide some extraordinary opportunities to high school students who have participated in its programs.
Juliet Stipeche, a member of the News Literacy Project's board, has been appointed by Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner to serve as his director of education.
Father Joseph Parkes, S.J., the founding president of NLP partner school Cristo Rey New York High School, calls news literacy "one of the most important needs in the country."
Since the launch of its classroom program seven years ago, NLP has helped young people gain the tools to become lifelong learners through the news media.
In just eight years, NLP has reached more than 23,000 students, worked with 150 diverse schools, 31 partner news organizations, and 300 journalist fellows have delivered more than 600 lessons.
Juliet Stipeche, an attorney and the former president of the Houston Independent School District (HISD) board, has joined the News Literacy Project's board.
Newspapers and websites that subscribe to material from the Tribune Content Agency (TCA) now can pick up News Literacy Project (NLP) blog items that analyze news literacy lessons in current events.
John Dickerson, the moderator of CBS News’ “Face the Nation,” said today that “the important thing about the News Literacy Project is that it ... creates a reflexive intent to seek the other side of the story or seek more information than you just read.”
The News Literacy Project will recognize the outstanding contributions of one or more of its journalist fellows annually in honor of John S. Carroll, the late chairman of NLP’s board and a renowned newspaper editor.
Greg McCaffery, the CEO and president of Bloomberg BNA, has joined the News Literacy Project’s board.
Rob King, ESPN’s senior vice president for “SportsCenter” and News, has joined the News Literacy Project’s board.
Newly compiled data from the 2014-15 school year indicate that the News Literacy Project’s model is successful, sustainable and replicable.
Bob Baker, a beloved former reporter and editor at the Los Angeles Times and an early friend of the News Literacy Project, died Friday. He was 67.
John S. Carroll, a revered newspaper editor and founding member of the News Literacy Project’s board, died this morning at his home in Lexington, Kentucky. He was 73.
Jee Yon Pae joined the News Literacy Project today as the organization’s first full-time development professional. She came to NLP from the Urban Alliance, a Washington nonprofit that provides internships, training and mentoring to youths in under-resourced communities.
The News Literacy Project (NLP) has been selected to appear in the prestigious Catalogue for Philanthropy: Greater Washington as “one of the best” community-based nonprofits in the region for 2015–16.
The News Literacy Project (NLP) is pleased to announce its launch in Houston, Texas, the organization's first expansion into a new region since 2009.
Erika Hobbs, a journalist and educator, is the new Chicago program manager for the News Literacy Project. She begins her position overseeing NLP’s most robust regional program today.
Nicco Mele, an acclaimed digital strategist who has served as the News Literacy Project’s pro bono technology adviser for more than four years, has been named deputy publisher of the Los Angeles Times.
News literacy, says Paul Gigot, editorial page editor and vice president of The Wall Street Journal, “is critical to much more than just the future of our business, of journalism, but to the future of democracy and governance.”
This school year, participating NLP students are engaging in a new lesson that explores the importance of a vigilant free press by bringing to life four case studies of notable investigative reporting.
On the “Face the Nation” set at CBS News’ Washington bureau, Bob Schieffer discussed his distinguished career in journalism, changes he has observed in politics and the news media, and the role of news literacy in the digital age.
The News Literacy Project is launching a series of online professional development workshops for teachers nationwide who are interested in introducing news literacy into their classrooms. The first workshop lesson will be Nov. 12.
The Kiwanis Club of Washington, D.C., has awarded the News Literacy Project a $10,000 grant to support a classroom program at a public school in the District during the 2014-15 school year.
Quantitative and qualitative information from students and teachers gathered throughout the 2013-14 school year consistently shows that NLP’s programs are achieving their goals by changing students’ knowledge, attitudes and behaviors about news and information.
NLP is pleased to announce the hiring of Tamara Johnson as the project’s new full-time program coordinator in New York, NLP’s third hire since the spring.
Alan Miller, NLP's president and founder, discussed NLP and news literacy on "The Diane Rehm Show" on public radio this morning.
Moderator Gwen Ifill and six high school students who completed NLP units elicited an exceptional response when they appeared before 1,100 philanthropic leaders at the Council on Foundations national conference in Washington in June to discuss how they consume news.
Elizabeth Marino, an experienced classroom teacher, has joined the News Literacy Project as program coordinator in Chicago. She will oversee expansion of NLP’s digital unit and work with other youth media programs throughout the city.
The Asian American Journalists Association is looking for 42 high school students for its 2014 journalism workshop at Emerson College in Boston this summer.
Three of Washington’s leading journalists discussed “America’s Changing Role in the World and How the Press Covers It” before an audience of more than 1,100 at George Washington University’s Lisner Auditorium on Nov. 13.
David Gonzalez, a co-editor of Lens, the visual journalism blog of The New York Times, visited an 8th-grade American studies class at De La Salle Academy on the Upper West Side of Manhattan on May 15 to offer the students guidance and feedback on their photojournalism projects.
Veronica Conforme, a vice president at the College Board and the former chief operating officer of the New York City Department of Education, has joined the News Literacy Project’s board.
The Sun-Times Foundation in Chicago has awarded the News Literacy Project a $25,000 matching grant to encourage additional individual, corporate and foundation contributions to NLP.
NLP’s major fall event in Washington will be a panel discussion on "America’s Changing Role in the World and How the Press Covers It" on Wednesday, Nov. 13, from 7:30 to 9 p.m. at George Washington University’s Lisner Auditorium, 730 21st St. NW.
The News Literacy Project and The Washington Post’s Young Journalists Development Program are presenting a series of innovative workshops for high school students this summer.
"The Kojo Nnamdi Show" on WAMU, a public radio station in Washington, D.C., devoted an hour Monday afternoon to a segment on the News Literacy Project and news literacy.
Eric Nadelstern, a professor at Columbia University’s Teachers College and a former deputy chancellor of the New York City Schools, has joined the News Literacy Project’s education advisory committee.
NLP staffers are prominently featured in two journalism publications this month.
The News Literacy Project is featured in an article in today’s editions of The Washington Post, “Schools demanding news literacy lessons to teach students how to find fact amid fiction.”
The News Literacy Project is one five nonprofits nationally featured in a Chronicle of Philanthropy report that spotlights organizations that have thrived despite launching amid the deep recession that began in 2008.
The News Literacy Project is now offering its first all-digital unit in Chicago schools and launched its first pilot of the unit in New York this week. It plans to offer a version of the unit in Washington, DC in the next school year.
Michael Gerson, an opinion writer whose nationally syndicated column appears twice weekly in The Washington Post, has joined the News Literacy Project’s board.
Bloomberg LP is partnering with the News Literacy Project on two innovative after-school programs with highly regarded middle schools in New York City and Washington this semester.
The Philadelphia Inquirer has joined the News Literacy Project as a participating news organization—expanding the journalistic reach of the program that is helping students in middle schools and high schools learn how to separate fact from fiction in the digital age.
The News Literacy Project is presenting a discussion of “Presidential Debates: Performance, Spin and the Press” at Georgetown University on Friday, Oct. 19—three days after the second presidential debate and three days before the third and final one.
The News Literacy Project will present its third annual Fall Forum, “Decision 2012: The Savvy Consumer’s Guide to Campaign Coverage,” on Wednesday, Sept. 19, at 7:30 p.m. The event at Walt Whitman High School features Washington Post columnist Ruth Marcus and CBS News national correspondent Chip Reid. Matea Gold, a Los Angeles Times Washington correspondent, will moderate the discussion.
In a widely syndicated column published today, Washington Post columnist Kathleen Parker calls the News Literacy Project a leader in the "growing news literacy movement aimed at teaching young people how to think critically and judge the quality of information." Parker recently joined the NLP board.
A recent report in the New York Times’ "SchoolBook" shines a spotlight on NLP’s partnership with The Facing History High School, a public school in Manhattan where NLP has been bringing its news literacy curriculum to students in English and Humanities classes the past four years.
The News Literacy Project is partnering with The Washington Post’s Young Journalists Development Program to offer three free half-day workshops for high school students at the Post this summer.
Kathleen Parker, a Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist for The Washington Post, has joined the News Literacy Project’s board.
Harlan Community Academy students visited the Chicago Defender newspaper on March 21 to learn about the 106-year-old publication’s important role in the Great Migration.
The News Literacy Project (NLP) made dramatic progress in 2012 in its mission to create a new generation of smarter and more engaged consumers and creators of credible news and information.
Not only is the News Literacy Project bringing journalists to students in schools, it’s increasingly bringing students to the journalists in their newsrooms.
For the second consecutive year, a News Literacy Project student from the Reavis School in Chicago has been featured on PBS’s “NewsHour Extra” website.
What do actor Humphrey Bogart and news literacy have in common? Plenty, according to a commentary in America, a Jesuit weekly that looks at political, economic and social issues from a Catholic perspective.
Columnists David Brooks of The New York Times and E.J. Dionne Jr. of The Washington Post will be the featured speakers at the News Literacy Project’s second annual Fall Forum, a series focusing on politics, public policy and the press.
De La Salle Academy, New York City’s only private coeducational nonsectarian middle school for academically gifted students who are economically less advantaged, is joining the News Literacy Project for the 2011-12 school year.
The News Literacy Project’s latest video, “How to Know What to Believe,” is now available on NLP’s YouTube and Vimeo channels.
The News Literacy Project (NLP) launched its expansion into Washington, D.C., schools on Tuesday with a kickoff event at E.L. Haynes Public Charter School featuring Gwen Ifill of PBS, who urged students to question the basis for believing what that they see, hear and read.
Qualcomm Inc., a San Diego-based world leader in 3G and next-generation mobile technologies, has become the lead sponsor of the News Literacy Project’s expansion into Washington, D.C.
Columnists David Brooks of The New York Times and E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post will discuss “Demosclerosis: The Challenge of Moving America Forward in a Hyper-Partisan Age” at 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Oct. 19, at Walt Whitman High School in Bethesda, Md.
The News Literacy Project (NLP) is gearing up for a landmark school year in New York City, more than doubling its roster of educational partners as it expands the program’s reach and impact into a broad array of learning environments.
The News Literacy Project’s growing program to give students the tools to know what to believe in a digital age was the subject of a seven-minute report on "PBS NewsHour" on Dec. 13.
Federal Communications Commissioner Michael Copps told leaders of community newspapers on July 21 that Americans need to become “a news-literate people” and praised the News Literacy Project for its efforts toward achieving that objective.
The News Literacy Project is partnering with The Washington Post’s Young Journalists Development Program to offer two half-day workshops for high school students at the paper this summer.
The News Literacy Project is partnering with The Washington Post’s Young Journalists Development Program to offer two half-day workshops for high school students at the paper this summer.
The News Literacy Project has been selected to be part of a social action campaign associated with the release of “Page One,” a documentary about The New York Times, which opened nationwide July 1.
The News Literacy Project has been selected to be part of a social action campaign associated with the release of “Page One,” a documentary about The New York Times, which opened nationwide July 1.
The News Literacy Project is cited as stepping into an “educational breach” in a much-anticipated government report released June 9 that focuses on the country’s rapidly evolving media environment.
The News Literacy Project is expanding into Washington, D.C., in the fall of 2011.
The News Literacy Project is stepping out on its own for the first time on May 1. The three-year-old project has been operating for nearly 2½ years under the fiscal sponsorship of the Poynter Institute for Media Studies.
The News Literacy Project’s latest video, “Making a Difference,” is now available on our YouTube channel.
The News Literacy Project hosted its first video conference for students in two cities on April 13, 2011.
David Rohde, a New York Times reporter who has twice won the Pulitzer Prize, captivated students and teachers at the Facing History School in New York City on March 30 with a presentation on the seven months he was held by the Taliban and why journalists such as himself risk their lives to report from dangerous areas.
Alan C. Miller, the president of the News Literacy Project, delivered the keynote address at the Student Scholarship & Creative Achievement Conference at Bemidji State University in Bemidji, Minn., on April 6.
On April 11, the News Literacy Project will be featured on AOL’s homepage as part of its “cause module” program.
Univision Communications Inc., the country’s leading media company serving the Hispanic community, has joined the News Literacy Project as a participating organization.
WTOP, an all-news radio station in Washington, D.C., has joined the News Literacy Project, making it the first radio station and the 19th news organization to participate.
Twenty-five journalism students from Northside College Prep High School in Chicago attended a day-long news literacy seminar at the Chicago bureau of the Associated Press on March 2.
A report in the January/February issue of Bethesda Magazine praises the role of the News Literacy Project at Walt Whitman High School in Bethesda.
The News Literacy Project has hired two staff members to build its capacity, strengthen its educational and digital programs, and expand in New York City.
Jay McTighe, an internationally renowned educational consultant and co-author of a text that is widely used to design curriculum, has joined the News Literacy Project’s education committee.
The Chicago Tribune published a report on the News Literacy Project’s impact in Chicago in its Jan. 19 editions.
The News Literacy Project had a string of remarkable successes in 2010.
The Chicago Sun-Times has joined the News Literacy Project, becoming the second news organization in Chicago—and the 18th nationally—to participate.
The News Literacy Project has produced a new video that focuses on middle school and high school students and teachers discussing their experiences as participants in the project.
Don Baer, the worldwide vice chairman of Burson-Marsteller, a strategic communications firm, has joined the board of the News Literacy Project.
A broadcast piece done by students participating in the News Literacy Project in Chicago is now posted on the PBS.org site.
The News Literacy Project (NLP) has begun its second full year in the classroom, partnering with five new middle schools and high schools in New York City, Chicago and Bethesda, Md.
The News Literacy Project has produced a video of its first month in middle school and high school classrooms in New York and Bethesda, Md. which is now available on our YouTube channel.
Reuters has joined the News Literacy Project, making it the third major wire service and the 17th news organization to participate.
Gwen Ifill, one of the country’s leading journalists, has joined the board of the News Literacy Project.
CBS News has joined the News Literacy Project, making it the fourth major television partner and the 16th news organization overall to participate. It has endorsed the project and is giving its journalists the opportunity to volunteer in the classroom and in other capacities.
The News Literacy Project has produced a new video showcasing the work of students at Walt Whitman High School in Bethesda, Md. “Students As Teachers” is now available on our YouTube channel.
Alison R. Bernstein, a vice president at the Ford Foundation, and Leslie Hill, a former member of the Dow Jones & Co. board of directors, are the newest members of the board of the News Literacy Project. Both women will serve three-year terms.
After completing a semester-long unit using the News Literacy Project curriculum, journalism students at Social Justice High School in Chicago gathered on June 9 for a round-table discussion with a public radio producer about current events, the role of journalism and the challenges and opportunities in their digital worlds.
Bloomberg has joined the News Literacy Project as a participant, becoming the 15th news organization to enlist in the growing national effort to help middle school and high school students sort fact from fiction in a digital world.
The News Literacy Project’s program at Walt Whitman High School in Bethesda, Md., is featured in two articles in the summer issue of Nieman Reports, published by the Nieman Foundation for Journalism at Harvard University.
The News Literacy Project has been awarded a $150,000 challenge grant from the Ford Foundation in recognition of NLP’s pioneering work to give students the ability to discern credible information in the digital age.
News literacy is crucial to sustaining a healthy democracy, according to an op-ed column co-authored by News Literacy Project executive director Alan C. Miller and published April 13, 2010 in USA Today, the nation’s largest general-circulation newspaper.
The Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting has joined the News Literacy Project as the 14th news organization to enroll in the national effort to help middle school and high school students become more frequent consumers and creators of credible information.
Building on a successful pilot program in late 2009, the News Literacy Project is growing in Chicago this year, expanding its presence in the pilot school and adding two new middle schools.
We are pleased to present the following report on the News Literacy Project’s first year of operations in the classroom.
In a world saturated with media messages, students need to learn to be literate, critical consumers of what they see and hear.
The News Literacy Project showcased its work in New York City schools at an Oct. 26 reception sponsored by Time Warner and attended by news media leaders and other well-known guests.
The Chicago Tribune has joined the News Literacy Project as a participating news organization, becoming the first Midwestern news organization to enlist in the effort to help middle school and high school students become smarter and more frequent consumers and creators of credible information.
President Barack Obama is calling upon Americans to “dedicate ourselves to increasing information literacy awareness so that all citizens understand its vital importance.”
NBC News has joined the News Literacy Project as a participating news organization, becoming the third major television network to enroll in the national effort to help middle school and high school students discern fact from fiction in the digital age.
The Los Angeles Times has joined the News Literacy Project as a participating news organization, becoming the first West Coast outlet to enroll in the effort to give middle school and high school students the critical thinking skills to sort faction from fiction in the digital age. The project aspires to expand to schools in Los Angeles in 2010.
The News Literacy Project is the focus of a 4,300-word cover story on news literacy published in the July/August issue of the Columbia Journalism Review.
The Associated Press has joined the News Literacy Project as a participating news organization, becoming the first wire service to enlist in the effort to help middle school and high school students become smarter and more frequent consumers and creators of credible information.
The Associated Press has joined the News Literacy Project as a participating news organization, becoming the first wire service to enlist in the effort to help middle school and high school students become smarter and more frequent consumers and creators of credible information.
The News Literacy Project listed its 100th volunteer journalist in its online directory this week.
The News Literacy Project is the focus of a lengthy report in Teacher Magazine, an online publication that is part of the Education Week group.
The publisher of The New York Times, Arthur O. Sulzberger Jr., praised the News Literacy Project last week for teaching “an invaluable lesson” by steering students to journalism that provides context and reassurance amid the country’s current economic turmoil.
National Public Radio has joined the News Literacy Project as a participating news organization – expanding the journalistic reach of the program that is helping students in middle schools and high schools learn how to separate fact from fiction in the digital age.
Five New York Times journalists and former CNN financial editor Myron Kandel are the News Literacy Project’s first participants in an after-school apprenticeship program in partnership with Citizen Schools.
CNN has joined the News Literacy Project as a participating news organization - the sixth print or broadcast outlet to endorse the program that helps students in middle schools and high schools appreciate quality journalism and learn how to consume and create credible information.
The News Literacy Project, an innovative national program that is bringing journalists into classrooms to help students learn to sort fact from fiction in the digital age, launches its pilot project at Walt Whitman High School in Bethesda, Md., today with an event featuring Mark Halperin of Time magazine and Pierre Thomas of ABC News.
The Washington Post has joined the News Literacy Project as a participating news organization — the fifth print or broadcast outlet to endorse the program that helps students in middle schools and high schools separate fact from fiction in the digital age.
The News Literacy Project, an innovative national program that is bringing journalists into middle schools and high schools to help students learn to sort fact from fiction in the digital age, kicked off today with an event featuring CNN’s Soledad O’Brien at the Williamsburg Collegiate Charter School in Brooklyn, N.Y.
James Rainey, the Los Angeles Times media columnist, has applauded the News Literacy Project.
ABC News and the CBS newsmagazine “60 Minutes” are the News Literacy Project’s first two participating broadcast news organizations.
The News Literacy Project is pleased to announce that the Poynter Institute for Media Studies, a leader in providing training that promotes excellence and integrity in journalism, has become its new partner and administrative home.
The News Literacy Project is pleased to welcome Melissa Nicolardi, a former New York City public school teacher and a documentary filmmaker, as New York program coordinator.
Twenty-four journalists have recently joined the News Literacy Project, bringing the total of participating news professionals to 55.
USA Today is the News Literacy Project’s second participating news organization.
The New York Times is the News Literacy Project’s first participating news organization.
Howard Gardner, a prominent Harvard educator, and Dave Jones, a former senior editor at the New York Times, have joined the News Literacy Project’s advisory committee.
The News Literacy Project is pleased to announce that Bob Jervis, the former coordinator of social studies for the Anne Arundel County (Md.) Public Schools, will be its curriculum developer.
Alan C. Miller, the News Literacy Project’s founder and executive director, discussed news literacy in the classroom—and the project’s plans to provide it—in remarks to the Knight Commission on the Information Needs of Communities in a Democracy.
Vivian Schiller, who chairs the News Literacy Project board, will become president and CEO of National Public Radio on Jan. 5.
The News Literacy Project is pleased to announce that our second New York City pilot will be with the Facing History School, a small, innovative, non-charter public high school on Manhattan’s West Side.
The News Literacy Project is featured in the November/December edition of The Social Studies Professional, the newsletter of the National Council for the Social Studies.
The News Literacy Project is delighted to welcome Kate Ferrall, a former teacher and broadcast journalist, as program coordinator. She brings valuable experience, talent and commitment to the mission.
The News Literacy Project is seeking retired journalists to work with New York middle school students from East Harlem and Brooklyn in early 2009.
The project is pleased to announce that Dr. Terry K. Peterson, who served as counselor to former Education Secretary Richard Riley, has joined the board.
The News Literacy Project aspires to engage students around real-world events and to find dynamic and innovative teachers as partners for our journalist fellows. Stuart Postle, who taught at Ridgewood High School in New Jersey and many other places, embodied these qualities. Alan Miller, the project’s executive director, wrote the attached tribute to this remarkable teacher. We hope it will inspire others to share their own memories of great teachers and what made them so special.
Frank Baker, a media literacy consultant and member of the project’s advisory committee, has recommended the following for teachers and those interested in news literacy matters:
A column in The Record of Hackensack, N.J., Mother Load: Trusting Information on the Web, explores the need for the News Literacy Project and related efforts.
How should the project approach students’ widespread use of Wikipedia as a research tool?
An administrator in a New York charter school said of her students: “They’re under the impression that if it’s found in print, it’s there because someone has determined that it’s reliable.”
Here’s a timely exercise for teachers: Have your students search for three to five things in print about the presidential or vice presidential candidates that are false.
We want to identify and create classroom exercises to give students the tools to distinguish between assertion and verification in news and other messages.
We want to engage students across the country in social networking around the news and news literacy through the tools they already use to connect: text messages, blogs, quizzes, polls and voting.
Gwen Ifill, the host of PBS’ “Washington Week’’ and one of the News Literacy Project’s initial journalist fellows, moderated the vice presidential debate between Sen. Joe Biden and Gov. Sarah Palin, the second time she was in this position.